SODIMMs are low-profile memory modules ideal for embedded-industrial and Industrial IoT designs. That’s due to their small form factor – roughly half the size of regular DIMM modules – yet still able to accommodate high capacities.  (Not long ago, we boosted the capacity of our SODIMM family to 32GB, giving designers an added edge.)
 
SODIMMs are ideal for IIoT and embedded-industrial applications, such as system boards using the COM Express, PC104 and Mini-ITX form factors that often are deployed in extreme-temperature environments.  They’re also designed into smaller-format industrial PCs and single-board computers popular in the industrial space, as well as into ruggedized notebook PCs, also deployed in harsh environments.  In fact, several Virtium customers have designed our SODIMM modules into systems operating in environment that can only be described as challenging – not the least of the challenges being extreme temperatures.

But when it comes to industrial-embedded memory such as SODIMMs, there’s temperature tolerance, and then there’s I-Temp. Make no mistake: they differ in major – and often mission-critical – ways.

I-Temp, short for Industrial Temperature, protects electronic devices such as embedded memory and solid-state storage – and more importantly, the data they store – in environments with extreme cold or heat. I-Temp range is from a low of  -40C to a high of 65 degrees Celsius.  For the Fahrenheit fans out there, that’s 40 degrees below zero to 185 degrees above it!

Some electronic-component makers claim their products can handle extreme temperatures.  But while that may be technically accurate, those assertions can be misleading – and even pose risks to system and data protection.  So, if you’re a designer of an embedded-industrial or Industrial IoT system and your search turns up a SODIMM memory module without the I-Temp support, keep searching.

There are, of course, memory solutions that can get by in less-severe temperatures, such as laptops and smartphones. Unless unintended circumstances put them there, they’re unlikely to be found in subzero or searing-heat temperatures.  Using I-Temp memory in them, therefore, would be overkill.

Embedded designs, on the other hand, wouldn’t so much as be conceptualized, let alone developed, if extreme temperatures weren’t first considered a real threat to system memory and the data entrusted to it.  And here’s where the distinction between temperature tolerance and I-Temp is crucial.

Again, there’s a world of difference between vague claims of extreme-temperature tolerance and actual, verifiable I-Temp protection.  We know that there are some memory developers out there who make those claims but we at Virtium are proud to claim confidently that our SODIMM memory modules, along with our other low-profile memory and industrial SSD solutions for embedded designs are indeed I-Temp.
 
But when it comes to industrial-embedded memory such as SODIMMs, there’s temperature tolerance, and then there’s I-Temp. Make no mistake: they differ in major – and often mission-critical – ways.
 
I-Temp, short for Industrial Temperature, protects electronic devices such as embedded memory and solid-state storage – and more importantly, the data they store – in environments with extreme cold or heat. I-Temp range is from a low of  -40C to a high of 65 degrees Celsius.  For the Fahrenheit fans out there, that’s 40 degrees below zero to 185 degrees above it!
 
Some electronic-component makers claim their products can handle extreme temperatures.  But while that may be technically accurate, those assertions can be misleading – and even pose risks to system and data protection.  So, if you’re a designer of an embedded-industrial or Industrial IoT system and your search turns up a SODIMM memory module without the I-Temp support, keep searching.
 
There are, of course, memory solutions that can get by in less-severe temperatures, such as laptops and smartphones. Unless unintended circumstances put them there, they’re unlikely to be found in subzero or searing-heat temperatures.  Using I-Temp memory in them, therefore, would be overkill.
 
Embedded designs, on the other hand, wouldn’t so much as be conceptualized, let alone developed, if extreme temperatures weren’t first considered a real threat to system memory and the data entrusted to it.  And here’s where the distinction between temperature tolerance and I-Temp is crucial.
 
Again, there’s a world of difference between vague claims of extreme-temperature tolerance and actual, verifiable I-Temp protection.  We know that there are some memory developers out there who make those claims but we at Virtium are proud to claim confidently that our SODIMM memory modules, along with our other low-profile memory and industrial SSD solutions for embedded designs are indeed I-Temp.